Categories
BIOL 2320C: Nutritional Science

Week 6: Food Issues

Week 6: Food Issues

Food is like the fuel in your car. If you want your car to run optimally, you will put the appropriate grade of gas in your tank and fill it up regularly. Throughout this course, you have learned that what goes into the body fuels it for healthy living, disease prevention, and optimum function. There are times when even healthy foods can be deemed unsafe due to natural contaminants, poor preservation and preparation, and substandard growing conditions. Strawberries have been recalled due to E. coli contamination. Lettuce has been recalled because of salmonella. Often, these problems can be solved by a recall or by washing the food with soap and water. But, in some cases, a large population gets very sick before the problem receives attention.

This week, you will learn about food safety issues and ways to decrease the risk of food-borne illness. You are nearing the end of your Nutritional Science journey. As you conclude this week’s coursework, be sure to take a moment to consider the effect information in the course has had on your own diet and eating habits.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
  • Analyze risks associated with improper food safety
  • Appraise the effectiveness of policies and regulations designed to protect the food supply
  • Recommend ways to reduce the impact or eliminate a food safety issue
  • Demonstrate knowledge of food safety issues

Learning Resources

Required Readings

Thompson, J., & Manore, M. (2015). Nutrition for life (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Benjamin Cummings.

  • Chapter 12, “Food Safety, Technology, and the New Food Movement” (pp. 368–398)Chapter 12 focuses on food safety, prevention of food-borne illnesses, malnutrition, and food preservation techniques.

The following USDA websites provide online food safety information, updates on food-borne illness outbreaks, guidelines for food preservation, resources for how to handle your food safety, and alerts on food recalls.United States Department of Agriculture: National Agricultural Library: Food Safety Research Information Office. (2016). Retrieved from http://fsrio.nal.usda.gov/United States Department of Agriculture. (2015). Food safety. Retrieved from http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=FOOD_SAFETY&parentnav=FOOD_NUTRITION&navtype=RT%2520 United States Department of Agriculture. (2015). Recalls and public health alerts. Food Safety and Inspection Service. Retrieved from http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts

The FDA branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services also provides several different websites to make sure that food safety information is available to the public.U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2016a). For health professionals. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/ForHealthProfessionals/default.htmU.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2016b). Recalls, market withdrawals, & safety alerts. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls/default.htmFoodsafety.gov. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.foodsafety.gov/
Compare this website to the other FDA websites above. How is it different? For which audience has this information been created?

Optional Resources

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2013). Everything Added to Food in the United States (EAFUS). Retrieved from http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/fcn/fcnNavigation.cfm?rpt=eafusListing&displayAll=true U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2015a). Summary of color additives for use in United States in foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/ColorAdditives/ColorAdditiveInventories/ucm115641.htm


Discussion: Food Safety Issues

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has strict guidelines for food safety. Bacteria, fungi, pesticides, hormones, and artificial compounds plague food supplies. What makes these contaminants frightening is that they are not generally visible to the naked eye and evidence of their presence in foods can be very difficult to detect without scientific testing. In this Discussion, you will look at how food safety affects health and explore solutions.

To prepare for this Discussion:

  • Review Chapter 12 of the course text, Nutrition for Life.
  • Think about the food contaminants affecting everyday foods.
  • Consider policies and regulations designed to protect the food supply. Are they effective?
  • Choose a food issue that is important to you. It may be an issue presented in your book or another one of your choice. Some suggested topics may include: food-borne illness, food additives and preservatives, pesticides, malnutrition, artificial sweeteners, water quality, et cetera.

With these thoughts in mind:

By Day 3

Post a 2- to 3-paragraph summary outlining the risks associated with a particular food safety issue. Be sure to include the following:

  • Justify why it is a food safety issue.
  • Correlate your food issue to a disease or health concern.
  • Evaluate and suggest 2–3 steps that could reduce the impact or eliminate the food issue.

Be sure to support your ideas by connecting them to the week’s Learning Resources, or something you have read, heard, seen, or experienced. Use at least two APA-formatted references for full credit.

Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

By Day 5

Respond to at least two of your colleagues’ postings in one or more of the following ways:

  • At least one response must be on a topic to which you did not initially post.
  • Provide your own interpretation of the food issue and your suggestions as to how to alleviate the problem.
  • Ask a probing question.
  • Share an insight from having read your colleague’s posting.
  • Offer and support an opinion.
  • Validate an idea with your own experience.
  • Make a suggestion.
  • Expand on your colleague’s posting.

Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of the comments your colleagues made.

Submission and Grading Information

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:Week 6 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 and Respond by Day 5

To participate in this Discussion:Week 6 Discussion


Quiz:

This 20-question, multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank quiz will assess how well you can apply the information in this week’s assigned readings.

About the quiz:

  • The quiz has a 2-hour time limit.
  • You may take the quiz as many times as you need in order to achieve a passing score.
  • If you encounter technical difficulties during the quiz or if you have questions about how a quiz works in your online classroom, contact the Student Support Team for more information. (The team’s contact information is in the Student Support area.)

By Day 7

Complete this week’s quiz.

Submission and Grading Information

Submit Your Quiz by Day 7

To submit your Quiz:Week 6 Quiz


Week in Review

In this final week, you analyzed the risks associated with improper food safety. You also appraised the effectiveness of policies/regulations designed to protect the food supply. In addition, you recommended ways to reduce the impact of, or eliminate, a food safety issue.

Congratulations! After you have finished all of the assignments for this week, you have completed the course. Please submit your Course Evaluation by Day 7.

Categories
BIOL 2320C: Nutritional Science

Week 5: Lifecycle Nutrition

Week 5: Lifecycle Nutrition

Have you ever purchased a “one size fits all” clothing item? While the concept is good, it rarely actually works out, since our bodies can vary significantly. Much like well-fitting clothing, nutrition is not a one-size-fits-all approach. Done correctly, it is highly customized to the individual’s needs.

Age, genetics, and phase of life all play a role in determining what the body needs. A teenage athlete may need more calories than a sedentary senior citizen. A pregnant woman has higher iron requirements than a non-pregnant woman. A man with high risk for heart disease may want to stock up on foods rich in healthy fats.

In this week’s Learning Resources, you will read about the changing requirements for vitamins, minerals, macronutrients, and activity for different stages of life. Think about this week’s content in terms of your own lifecycle nutrition needs.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
  • Analyze findings from the MyDietAnalysis program
  • Synthesize findings to course information
  • Recommend dietary modifications to meet daily nutritional requirements
  • Demonstrate knowledge of changing nutritional needs throughout the life cycle
  • Support how awareness of one’s dietary choices can result in improved eating habits

Learning Resources

Required Readings

Pearson. (2016). MyDietAnalysis. Retrieved from https://media.pearsoncmg.com/bc/abp/mydietanalysis/

Thompson, J., & Manore, M. (2015). Nutrition for life (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Benjamin Cummings.

  • Chapter 11, “Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle” (pp. 326–367)The authors describe how nutrition and healthy habits are important throughout all stages of life. They detail the changing nutrition needs from prior to conception, throughout pregnancy, childhood, teen years, adulthood, and senior years.

Utilize the specific United States Department of Agriculture web pages below to support your knowledge of lifecycle nutrition.United States Department of Agriculture: National Agricultural Library: Food and Nutrition Information Center. (2016). Lifecycle nutrition. Retrieved from http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/lifecycle-nutritionNutrition.gov. (2016). Life stages. Retrieved from http://www.nutrition.gov/life-stagesWalden University. (2015h). Writing Center: Walden templates: Overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/templates
Click on “General Templates” and then APA Course Paper Template with Advice (6th ed.) under “Course Paper.” This template will help you format your Final Project paper correctly. You will use this template to write the paper for your Final Project, due by Day 7 of this week.

Optional Resources

HelpGuide.org. (2016b). Healthy food for kids: Nutrition tips for children and teens. Retrieved from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-eating/nutrition-for-children-and-teens.htmHelpGuide.org. (2016a). Eating well as you age: Nutrition and diet tips for healthy eating as you age. Retrieved from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-eating/eating-well-as-you-age.htmNIH Senior Health. (n.d.). Eating well as you get older: Benefits of eating well. Retrieved from http://nihseniorhealth.gov/eatingwellasyougetolder/benefitsofeatingwell/01.html


Looking Ahead:

Final Project Milestone: Submitting Your Final Project

Your Final Project is due by Day 7 of this week. Refer to this week’s Project area for detailed instructions about how to prepare for and submit your Final Project.


Project: Final Project: Analyze Your Diet With MyDietAnalysis

For the past 4 weeks, you have been learning how the science of nutrition affects the health of the human body. The MyDietAnalysis program provided the opportunity to analyze your own nutrition habits and apply the lessons from this course.

Now, in your Final Project, you will provide a detailed analysis of your findings from the MyDietAnalysis program, correlate those findings to course information, and recommend dietary modifications to meet your daily nutritional requirements.

To prepare for this Final Project:

  • Review your completed Final Project Milestones.
  • Think about how you eat and what you eat.
  • Consider the changes you could make to improve your health.

The Final Project:

  • Write a 4- to 6-page formal report that analyzes your 3-day diet using the MyDietAnalysis program. You will specify the total values of dietary intake for various vitamins, minerals, and organic compounds. You will also evaluate the effectiveness of this 3-day diet and recommend modifications that may be needed to meet daily requirements. Your Final Project should include all of the steps taken to complete this project. This includes:
    • Title Page
    • Introduction
    • Part I
      • Steps 1–3
      • Your 3-day diet written out and given motivation codes
      • Your Actual Intakes vs. Recommended Intakes and Activity Summary reports
    • Part II
      • Step 4
      • 4–6 pages analyzing your diet
    • References

As a reminder, here is a more detailed description of each of the Final Project Steps:

Final Project Steps

Step 1: Record everything you eat and drink for 3 days in a row.

  • Record all the foods and beverages you consume over the course of 3 days. The best 3 days to choose are 2 weekdays and a weekend day, although it is your decision as to which days contain the most “normal” food consumption for you. Do not alter your normal eating pattern.
  • In a lab notebook or food diary, record the amount of food and beverages consumed, including water. Do not record any mineral or vitamin supplements. Do record protein supplements.
  • Be sure to describe each food completely. This includes brand names, ingredients in a recipe, etc. For homemade items, be sure to record portions of all the components in your food, because you will input them separately if no comparable meal can be found in MyDietAnalysis.
  • Record any exercise you perform.
  • Make note of how you feel physically and emotionally after you eat a specific food or meal. Great insight can be gained by closely observing how your body reacts to foods.

Step 2: Organize your recorded information.

  • Type each day’s food and beverages into the menu form: breakfast, snack, lunch, etc. Include everything from your food diary or lab notebook and record them separated by day.
  • Label each item on your menu with the code or codes that indicate why you chose to eat that food or drink that beverage.
CodeMotivation
APersonal preference (I like it.)
BHabit or tradition (It’s familiar; I always eat it.)
CSocial pressure (It was offered; I couldn’t refuse.)
DAvailability (I was hungry and it was nearby.)
EConvenience (I was too rushed to prepare anything else.)
FEconomy (It was a food I could afford.)
GHealth value (I think it is healthy for me to eat.)
HAdvertising
IOther (explain)

Step 3: Enter your organized diet information into the MyDietAnalysis program.

  • Enter the foods you ate into the MyDietAnalysis program.
  • Be sure to create a new profile to reflect your recorded information. The program will ask you questions about yourself—be honest! It is important to capture your true self for MyDietAnalysis to be accurate and representative of your needs.
  • After you have created your profile, click on the DIET TRACKER tab at the top of the program.
  • Enter your foods as accurately as possible. Do this for each new day and save changes when finished.
  • Next, click on the ACTIVITY TRACKER and record any additional exercise you may have completed above and beyond your profile’s activity level. (For example, if you are sedentary and you walk the dog, realize that this activity is included in the sedentary profile. However, if you run for 10 minutes this should be added as additional exercise.)
  • Finally, click on the REPORTS tab.
  • Download the Actual Intakes vs. Recommended Intakes and the Activity Summary reports as PDF documents. This information will be included in your final report.

Steps 1–3 will be due by Day 7 of Week 3.

Step 4: Analyze your diet in a formal report.

Include the following information:

  1. List any vitamins and minerals that averaged less than 100% of the RDA.
  2. For each vitamin or mineral that averaged less than 100% of the RDA, suggest two foods that would increase the amount of that nutrient in your diet.
    • Why did you pick those foods? Are they realistic to YOUR diet?
    • Suggest ways you would incorporate them directly into your diet.
  3. How many grams of fiber did you consume per day?
    • What is the recommended intake per day?
    • If you ate less than the recommended daily intake, how could you realistically increase your fiber?
    • If you ate more than the recommendation, what are the foods in your diet that are contributing to this total?
    • Please be sure to describe the differences between soluble fiber and insoluble fiber.
  4. How many different fruits, vegetables, and grains did you consume daily?
    • Could your diet benefit from more diversity? Why?
    • What are some of the reasons fruits and vegetables are hard to include in your diet? Is it because of past memories of eating them? Taste? If you love fruits and vegetables, can you offer an idea why others may not?
    • What is it about fruits and vegetables that make them so nutritious? Discuss three major components of these foods and why they are beneficial.
  5. What have you learned about your eating habits? Pay attention to the codes you assigned to your foods.
  6. Provide your overall observations of your diet. Summarize your codes and reflect on what is your major driving force when it comes to food.
  7. Describe any changes that you have made or plan to make as a result of this exercise. Provide a detailed answer to receive full credit. Answers such as “I plan to eat more fruits and vegetables” without a clear plan will not be awarded full points.

Directions for formatting your Final Project report:

  • Keep all data in one file (unless different formats do not allow them to be together in one file).
  • Cite at least three APA-formatted scientific references. You do not need to reference your values from MyDietAnalysis. (In other words, if you consumed 5000mg of sodium, you don’t need to reference that.)
  • Be sure to complete the assignment in complete essay form. (Do not write the question and then the answer—use full paragraphs.) The 4- to 6-page requirement does notinclude your charts and motivation codes.
  • Use double spacing, 12-point Times New Roman, and APA format. Page count is 4–6 pages. A template for this paper can be found at the Walden Writing Center. Click on the plus sign next to Course Paper and then click on the APA Course Paper Template with Advice (6th ed.). This template will help you format your Final Project paper correctly.

By Day 7

Submit your Final Project.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Project for review and grading, do the following:

  • Please save your Project using the naming convention “WK5Proj+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
  • Click the Week 5 Project Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Project.
  • Click the Week 5 Project link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
  • Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK5Proj+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
  • If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
  • Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:Week 5 Project Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:Submit your Week 5 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Project by Day 7

To submit your Project:Week 5 Project


Quiz:

This 20-question, multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank quiz will assess how well you can apply the information in this week’s assigned readings.

About the quiz:

  • The quiz has a 2-hour time limit.
  • You may take the quiz as many times as you need in order to achieve a passing score.
  • If you encounter technical difficulties during the quiz or if you have questions about how a quiz works in your online classroom, contact the Student Support Team for more information. (The team’s contact information is in the Student Support area.)

By Day 7

Complete this week’s quiz.

Submission and Grading Information

Submit Your Quiz by Day 7

To submit your Quiz:Week 5 Quiz


Week in Review

This week, you recommended dietary modifications to meet daily nutritional requirements. You also analyzed findings from the MyDietAnalysis program. In addition, you identified the changing nutritional needs throughout the life cycle and synthesized all of your findings in the course information.

In the final week, you will explore food safety and ways to decrease the risk of food-borne illness.

Categories
BIOL 2320C: Nutritional Science

Week 4: Healthy Diet, Healthy Life

Week 4: Healthy Diet, Healthy Life

In 2010, United States First Lady Michelle Obama launched the “Let’s Move!” campaign to fight childhood obesity across the country. The U.S. was spending $150 billion a year treating preventable, obesity-related diseases. The situation is an extreme example of how lack of exercise and nutrition can lead to an unhealthy nation. It’s a global problem; around the world, obesity rates are on the rise. Many are questioning portion sizes, food sources, and a lack of movement.

On the opposite side of the weight war is what is known as the French Paradox. The French consume rich cheeses, cream, and wine, but manage to stay healthy. The secret seems to be shared by healthy nations like Japan and the Netherlands. They attribute their good health to two factors: a diet filled with whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and choosing walking and bicycling for daily travel needs.

This week, you will learn about the benefits of maintaining a healthy weight and the negative effects of both obesity and being underweight. You will learn how to create a healthy movement and exercise plan for all phases of life. You will also determine nutritional needs for individuals with restricted diets and different activity levels.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
  • Evaluate specific foods to enable individuals to meet their recommended daily allowances
  • Recommend a nutritional and exercise plan for a person with alternative dietary needs
  • Analyze the roles of enzymes and lactose in digestion
  • Explore how enzymes help the body break down food into soluble macronutrients by completing a virtual laboratory experience
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the components of overall health
  • Support how awareness of one’s dietary choices can result in improved eating habits*

*This Learning Objective is explored in Week 4 and will be completed in Week 5.


Learning Resources

Required Readings

Thompson, J., & Manore, M. (2015). Nutrition for life (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Benjamin Cummings.

  • Chapter 9, “Achieving and Maintaining a Healthful Body Weight” (pp. 250–292)This chapter focuses on scientific ways to determine a healthy body weight, weight change plans, and disordered eating patterns.
  • Chapter 10, “Nutrition and Physical Activity: Keys to Good Health” (pp. 293–325)In this chapter, the authors outline the benefits of physical activity, how to develop a fitness plan, and the biochemical effects of exercise on the body.
  • Review Chapter 5, “Proteins: Crucial Components of All Body Tissues” (pp. 129–154), which you should have initially read in Week 2.

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2016). Virtual biology lab [Interactive media]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Optional Resources

American Diabetes Association. (2016). Create your plate. Retrieved from http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/create-your-plate/Harvard School of Public Health. (n.d.-a). Healthy eating plate & healthy eating pyramid. The Nutrition Source. Retrieved from https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-eating-plate/Harvard School of Public Health. (n.d.-b). Healthy weight. The Nutrition Source. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-weight/Harvard School of Public Health. (n.d.-c). Staying active. The Nutrition Source. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/staying-active/Let’s Move! (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.letsmove.gov/Mayo Clinic. (n.d.). Vegetarian diet pyramid. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/vegetarian-diet-pyramid/img-20008075

Painter, J., Rah, J.-H., & Lee, Y-K. (2002). Comparison of international food guide pictorial representations. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 102(4), 483–489.


Discussion: Alternative Dietary Considerations

People come in all shapes, sizes, and beliefs. Sometimes diet and exercise recommendations are not appropriate for certain individuals because they are on restrictive diets or have health issues that restrict exercise. Furthermore, individuals have different energy requirements based on their daily activities, jobs, et cetera. Some individuals meet daily activity levels for optimal health while others struggle to be regularly active.

To prepare for this Discussion:

  • Review Chapters 9 and 10 in your course text.
  • Think about dietary constraints of people who are lactose intolerant, have celiac disease, do not eat animal proteins, are diabetic, or have hypertension.
  • Consider how these individuals can still eat healthy, well-rounded diets despite their dietary constraints. Think about how people can sustain healthy energy levels, given their restricted diets.

With these thoughts in mind:

By Day 3

Post a 3- to 4-paragraph summary recommending a nutritional plan for an individual who requires an alternative diet. Select an issue above or identify another issue related to dietary restrictions or health issues. In your summary, be sure to address the following:

  • Describe the RDAs for proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, as well as any other important vitamins and minerals you feel should be highlighted for an individual with your selected dietary restrictions or requirements.
  • Suggest specific foods and serving sizes that will help the individual meet their RDAs while considering their dietary or health issues.
  • Recommend 2–3 substitutions the individual should make in regard to their dietary restrictions or health issue. Describe why they are healthy substitutions. For example, you might suggest kidney beans instead of chicken for a vegetarian because kidney beans have comparable protein levels for equal weight.
  • Suggest a daily or weekly activity plan to help the individual meet activity needs while still being healthy and balanced.

Be sure to support your ideas by connecting them to the week’s Learning Resources, or something you have read, heard, seen, or experienced. Use at least two APA-formatted references for full credit.

Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

By Day 5

Respond to at least two of your colleagues’ postings in one or more of the following ways:

  • At least one response must be on the topic in which you did not initially post.
  • Ask a probing question.
  • Share an insight from having read your colleague’s posting.
  • Offer and support an opinion.
  • Validate an idea with your own experience.
  • Make a suggestion.
  • Expand on your colleague’s posting.

Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of the comments your colleagues made.

Submission and Grading Information

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:Week 4 Assignment Rubric

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7

To submit your Assignment:Week 4 Assignment


Assignment: Virtual Lab: Enzymes and Lactose Intolerance

Enzymes are proteins that make all the chemical reactions associated with metabolism possible. Most enzymes are responsible for only one particular chemical reaction. Lactase is an enzyme whose job is to digest lactose, a carbohydrate found in milk. For people who do not produce enough of the enzyme lactase, eating dairy products causes digestive discomforts such as gas, bloating, cramping, and even diarrhea.

In this Virtual Lab, you will observe how lactase works by testing the dietary supplement Lactaid and how it breaks down lactose in the body.

To prepare for this Assignment:

  • Review Chapter 5 of your Course Text, Nutrition for Life, which was the required reading for Week 2.
  • Think about the digestion of organic groups in foods and the role of enzymes in chemical reactions. Specifically, consider the job lactose plays in digestion.
  • Consider the conditions that an enzyme requires for optimum performance.

For this Assignment, you will complete an interactive virtual lab experience to discover how enzymes help the body break down food into usable macronutrients. Click on the link to access and complete the lab activity.

Click on this link to access and complete the lab activity: https://mym.cdn.laureate-media.com/2dett4d/Walden/BIOL/2320/CH/mm/bio-lab/index.html#/?_k=owkw9f

By Day 7

Complete your virtual lab. Once you have completed the lab, be sure to print out your Completion Certificate as a PDF, and submit it to your instructor on or before Day 7. Once your instructor receives your Completion Certificate, he or she will enter a grade of “Complete” in the gradebook.

Questions about this Assignment? Post them in the Contact the Instructor area. That way, everyone in the class will see, and benefit from, the Instructor’s response.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

  • Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK4Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
  • Click the Week 4 Assignment link.
  • Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK4Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
  • If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
  • Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:Submit your Week 4 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7

To submit your Assignment:Week 4 Assignment


Quiz:

This 20-question, multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank quiz will assess how well you can apply the information in this week’s assigned readings.

About the quiz:

  • The quiz has a 2-hour time limit.
  • You may take the quiz as many times as you need in order to achieve a passing score.
  • If you encounter technical difficulties during the quiz or if you have questions about how a quiz works in your online classroom, contact the Student Support Team for more information. (The team’s contact information is in the Student Support area.)

By Day 7

Complete this week’s quiz.

Submission and Grading Information

Submit Your Quiz by Day 7

To submit your Quiz:Week 4 Quiz


Project

Final Project Milestone: Continue Working on Your Final Project

Now that you have submitted Steps 1–3, focus your attention on the final step of your project—Step 4. As always, contact your Instructor if you have any questions or concerns about using MyDietAnalysis. Please note: Your Final Project is due next week (Week 5) by Day 7.


Week in Review

This week, you evaluated specific foods and daily allowances. You also recommended a nutritional and exercise plan for a person with alternative dietary needs. In addition, you analyzed the role of enzymes and lactose in digestion and examined how enzymes help the body break down food into soluble macronutrients.

Next week, you will examine lifecycle nutrition and how nutritional requirements change at different stages of life.

Categories
BIOL 2320C: Nutritional Science

Week 3: Evaluating Nutrition

Week 3: Evaluating Nutrition

Let your food be your medicine and your medicine be your food.
—Hippocrates (ca. 460–370 BC)

In the early 1600s, British doctors suggested that sailors stock up on citrus fruits to prevent scurvy on their long voyages. Scientists later isolated vitamin C, found in the fruits, as the primary ingredient in preventing the disease.

If you have a sore muscle or itchy skin, a doctor might suggest a cream with the active ingredient capsaicin. Capsaicin, a compound found naturally in foods, is the component that makes hot peppers hot.

These are just two examples of how the body uses the vitamins and minerals in food. Scientists continue to discover how compounds and nutrients like vitamin C and capsaicin can prevent disease and keep bodies functioning. Researchers, news stories, and advertisements proclaim the benefits of optional vitamin and mineral products. How much does the body truly need? What affects these requirements? Is adding nutrients to water the answer to getting them into diets? In this week, you will learn about the role of vitamins, minerals, and water in keeping a body healthy and how enzymes help the body process these nutrients.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
  • Apply observational data to develop and test a hypothesis
  • Apply the scientific method to a specific problem
  • Apply the MyDietAnalysis program to track and analyze food choices
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how vitamins, minerals, and water contribute to health
  • Synthesize awareness of one’s dietary choices and how these can result in improved eating habits*

*This Learning Objective is explored in Week 3 and will be completed in Week 5.


Learning Resources

Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Required Readings

Thompson, J., & Manore, M. (2015). Nutrition for life (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Benjamin Cummings.

  • Chapter 6, “Vitamins: Micronutrients with Macro Powers” (pp. 155–191)In this chapter, the authors detail the roles of different vitamins and how the body uses them. Also outlined are the differences between fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins, the role of antioxidants, and how cancer grows in the body.
  • Chapter 7, “Minerals: Building and Moving Our Bodies” (pp. 192–224)In Chapter 7, you see how individual minerals work in the body, their sources, and how blood transports these nutrients.
  • Chapter 8, “Fluid Balance, Water, and Alcohol” (pp. 225–249)Water makes up more than half the body. In Chapter 8, you will learn what water does for the body, how it is lost, and good sources for replenishing it. This chapter also discusses how alcohol affects the body.

Exploratorium. (2016). Institute for Inquiry: Examining the art of science education. Retrieved from http://www.exploratorium.edu/education/ifi
You will use this resource for this week’s Assignment.
Katan, M. B. (2007). Does industry sponsorship undermine the integrity of nutrition research? PLoS Medicine, 4(1), e6UC Berkeley Library. (2016). Critical evaluation. Evaluating Resources: Home. Retrieved from http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/evaluating-resourcesDocument: To Generate and Save a Report (Word document)

Optional Resources

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (2016). Eat right. Retrieved from http://www.eatright.org/American Association for the Advancement of Science. (2016). Integrity in scientific research video series. Retrieved from http://www.aaas.org/page/integrity-scientific-research-video-seriesCenters for Disease Control. (n.d.). Water & nutrition: Basics. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/nutrition/Edmund, N. W. (2011). The scientific method today. Retrieved from http://www.scientificmethod.com/United States Department of Agriculture. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.fns.usda.gov/World Health Organization. (2016). Nutrition: Nutrition health topics. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/en/


Looking Ahead

Final Project Milestone: Submitting Steps 1–3

This week, your MyDietAnalysis Report (Steps 1–3 of your Final Project) is due by Day 7.

Refer to this week’s Project area for detailed instructions about how to prepare for and submit your work.


Assignment: The Scientific Method

Have you ever had a problem that you needed to solve, or a question that you needed to answer? Scientists have this dilemma all the time and use the scientific method to solve problems and answer questions. The scientific method was developed to standardize scientific research. This clearly defined process to evaluate data and propose new ideas ensures that research has been properly conducted and analyzed. Further, the scientific method allows for reproduction of the experiment by other researchers and should lead to the same results every time.

For this week’s Assignment, you will be asked to apply the scientific method related to an observation you can make in your own life.

To prepare for this Assignment:

  • Review your course text, paying particular attention to content related to the scientific method and who you can trust to help you choose foods wisely.
  • Also review the Institute for Inquiry website in this week’s Learning Resources.
  • Consider a case in your own life where you could use the scientific method, or elements of the scientific method, to solve a problem. Think about observations you make on a daily basis that are related to nutrition. This may include how many alcohol commercials play during sporting events on the television, how many coworkers bring sack lunches for lunch versus take-out or frozen lunches, or the number of sugary cereal commercials that play during cartoons on Saturday mornings, for example.
  • Choose an observation related to nutrition that you would like to investigate by using the scientific method.
  • From your observation, propose a hypothesis. For example, “More alcohol commercials play during a basketball game on the television than during a made-for-TV romantic drama.”
  • After you have determined your hypothesis, observe and collect data that will help you support or disprove your hypothesis. (For the example hypothesis, this would include watching a basketball game and recording the number of alcohol commercials played during that game and then watching a made-for-TV romantic drama and recording the number of alcohol commercials that play during that program.)

The Assignment (2 pages):

  • Write a 2-page, double-spaced paper in which you apply the scientific method to observation and data analysis and test your hypothesis based on your observations. Please make sure that your paper contains all of the following headers:
    • Abstract: This is a brief, 150-word summary of the entire paper, including the results you found. This does not need to contain citations.
    • Introduction: The introduction is a statement of why you decided to conduct your research study and what information it has the potential to contribute to the scientific world. Be sure to include any background information important for the reader to understand your study. Also, be sure to identify clearly your hypothesis statement. (1–2 paragraphs)
    • Methods and Materials: Describe the process you went through to collect your data in detail, including minor elements that may be relevant, like time or day, or anything important for the reader to understand your data collection methods. (1–2 paragraphs)
    • Results and Conclusion: Provide the results of your data, either in tabular form or written out as part of the essay. Also, be sure to interpret your results clearly and provide your reasoning on whether you can or cannot support your original hypothesis. Remember, even results that do not support your original hypothesis are a good contribution to science! (1–2 paragraphs)
  • Remember to include citations, especially in your Introduction and Conclusion. It is important to support your ideas by citing relevant research or scientific concepts.
  • Use at least two APA-formatted references. Submit your paper with double spacing in 12-point Times New Roman.

If you have questions about this Assignment, please post them in the Contact the Instructor area. That way, everyone in the class will see, and benefit from, the Instructor’s response.

By Day 7

Submit your Assignment.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

  • Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK3Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
  • Click the Week 3 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
  • Click the Week 3 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
  • Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK3Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
  • If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
  • Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:Week 3 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:Submit your Week 3 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7

To submit your Assignment:Week 3 Assignment


Project: Final Project Milestone: MyDietAnalysis Reports

By the end of this week, you should have recorded your 3-day food journal, entered the information into the MyDietAnalysis program, and generated two reports from the MyDietAnalysis program: Actual Intakes vs. Recommended Intakes and an Activity Summary. This week’s Final Project Milestone is submitted for a grade and will also give you the opportunity to consult with your Instructor for guidance, if necessary.

To prepare for this Project:

  • Complete Steps 1–3 of the Final Project.

The Project:

  • Submit your two MyDietAnalysis reports. The two reports are:
    • Actual Intakes vs. Recommended Intakes
    • Activity Summary

For instructions on how to generate and save a report, refer to the Required Resources document, “To Generate and Save a Report.”

Questions about this Assignment? Post them in the Contact the Instructor area. That way, everyone in the class will see, and benefit from, the Instructor’s response.

By Day 7

Submit your Project.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Project for review and grading, do the following:

  • Please save your Project using the naming convention “WK3Proj+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
  • Click the Week 3 Project Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Project.
  • Click the Week 3 Project link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
  • Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK3Proj+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
  • If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
  • Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:Week 3 Project Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:Submit your Week 3 Project draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Project by Day 7

To submit your Project:Week 3 Project


Quiz

This 20-question, multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank quiz will assess how well you can apply the information in this week’s assigned readings.

About the quiz:

  • The quiz has a 2-hour time limit.
  • You may take the quiz as many times as you need in order to achieve a passing score.
  • If you encounter technical difficulties during the quiz or if you have questions about how a quiz works in your online classroom, contact the Student Support Team for more information. (The team’s contact information is in the Student Support area.)

By Day 7

Complete this week’s quiz.

Submission and Grading Information

Submit Your Quiz by Day 7

To submit your Quiz:Week 3 Quiz


Week in Review

This week, you applied the scientific method to a particular problem, including observational data, in order to develop and test a hypothesis. You also had an opportunity to use the MyDietAnalysis program to track and analyze food choices.

Next week, you will learn about the benefits of maintaining a healthy weight and the negative effect of obesity and

Categories
BIOL 2320C: Nutritional Science

Week 2: Building Blocks for Nutrition

Week 2: Building Blocks for Nutrition

Do you ever think of certain foods as good or bad? In the late 1980s and early 1990s, popular diets advertised that as long as a food was labeled low-fat or fat-free, it was good. Following that logic, oversized bagels covered in fat-free cream cheese were thought of as a health food. Then, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, this trend reversed. Bagels were deemed bad, and steak and butter were in vogue—thus, good.

This week, you will discern the difference between foods labeled good and bad, learn how the body uses carbohydrates and fats, and identify the nutrient content of different foods.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
  • Appraise the role of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in a healthy diet
  • Explain criteria for determining good and bad carbohydrates and fats
  • Analyze the effects of good and bad carbohydrates and fats on health
  • Analyze foods to determine major organic groups
  • Investigate various component nutrients by completing a virtual laboratory experience
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of foods in building healthy bodies
  • Synthesize awareness of one’s dietary choices and how these can result in improved eating habits*

Learning Resources

Required Readings

Thompson, J., & Manore, M. (2015). Nutrition for life (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Benjamin Cummings.

  • Chapter 3, “Carbohydrates: Plant-Derived Energy Nutrients” (pp. 69–99)Carbohydrates are the body’s basic source of energy. In Chapter 3, the authors outline how the body uses carbohydrates, the different types of carbohydrates, and how to differentiate between good and bad sources of the nutrient.
  • Chapter 4, “Fat: An Essential Energy-Supplying Nutrient” (pp. 100–128)Fats and lipids are an energy source for the body and have several important roles to play in its function. The authors point out the differences in types of fats, how the body uses them, and how consumers can tell which kinds of fats are healthiest to eat.
  • Chapter 5, “Proteins: Crucial Components of All Body Tissues” (pp. 129–154)Proteins are the body’s building blocks for muscle, tissue, blood, and bone. Chapter 5 explains how the body uses proteins and breaks down the amino acids that make up proteins, and outlines the body’s protein requirements.

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2016). Virtual biology lab [Interactive media]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Optional Resources

Center for Science in the Public Interest. (n.d.). 10 foods you should never eat. Nutrition Action: Health Letter. Retrieved from http://web.archive.org/web/20010303014119/http://www.cspinet.org/nah/10foods_bad.htmlHarvard School of Public Health (n. d.-d). What should I eat? The Nutrition Source. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/Healthfinder.gov. (2016). Dietary fats. Retrieved from http://www.healthfinder.gov/FindServices/SearchContext.aspx?topic=944Helmenstine, A. M. (2014). Is it safe to use kitchen glassware for chemistry? About Education. Retrieved from http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemistryfaqs/f/kitchenchem.htmMayo Clinic. (2015). Healthy lifestyle: Nutrition and healthy eating. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/fiber/art-20043983?p=1U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2015b). Trans fat now listed with saturated fat and cholesterol. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling/labelingnutrition/ucm274590.htmUnited States Department of Agriculture. (2016). MyPlate. Retrieved from http://www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/


Discussion: Good and Bad Foods

Medical publications and physicians direct people to increase consumption of good carbs and fats while decreasing consumption of those labeled bad. But what does that mean? What qualifies a food as good or bad?

For this Discussion, you are going to identify foods in your diet that might be labeled bad and suggest how you can replace them with good foods.

To prepare for this Discussion:

  • Review this week’s Learning Resources.
  • Think about how good versions of carbohydrate and fats contribute to positive health outcomes, while the badversions create short- and long-term health issues.
  • Remember to use scientific sources to research your topic. Random websites may provide inadequate or false scientific information. Your credibility depends on the credibility of your references.
  • You will be assigned one of the following scenarios by your Instructor:

Scenario #1: Good Fats? Bad Fats?

  1. Choose one good fat and one bad fat as identified in your course text.
  2. Provide 2–3 food sources for each of your good and bad fats.
  3. Describe how fats are digested and where they are absorbed. Explain what determines whether a fat is a good fat or a bad fat. What role does covalent bonding play in whether a fat is identified as good or bad?
  4. Describe some of the consequences associated with the overconsumption of bad fats.
  5. What did you learn that you did not know before? In what way will it influence the food choices you make now?

Scenario #2: Good Carbs? Bad Carbs?

  1. Choose one good carbohydrate and one bad carbohydrate as identified in your course text.
  2. Identify two food sources that you eat that contain a bad carbohydrate.
  3. Describe how carbohydrates are digested and where they are absorbed. Explain what determines whether a carbohydrate is a good carbohydrate or a bad carbohydrate. What does the identification of a carbohydrate as a monosaccharide, disaccharide, or polysaccharide have to do with whether it is classified as good or bad?
  4. Describe some of the consequences associated with the overconsumption of bad carbohydrates.
  5. What did you learn that you did not know before? In what way will it influence the food choices you make now?

With these thoughts in mind:

By Day 3

Post a 2- to 3-paragraph analysis that compares good foods and bad foods based on your assigned scenario. Articulate how the consumption of good or bad foods (focusing on either carbohydrates or fats, based on your assigned scenario) may impact digestion and overall health. Discuss the specific health benefits of switching to good carbohydrates or good fats.

Be sure to support your ideas by connecting them to the week’s Learning Resources, or something you have read, heard, seen, or experienced. Use at least two scientific APA-formatted references for full credit.

Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

By Day 5

Respond to at least two of your colleagues’ postings in one or more of the following ways:

  • At least one response must be on the topic in which you did not initially post.
  • Ask a probing question.
  • Share an insight from having read your colleague’s posting.
  • Offer and support an opinion.
  • Validate an idea with your own experience.
  • Make a suggestion.
  • Expand on your colleague’s posting.

Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of the comments your colleagues made.

Submission and Grading Information

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:Week 2 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 and Respond by Day 5

To participate in this Discussion:Week 2 Discussion


Assignment: Virtual Lab: Chemistry of Food

Proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids are all organic groups found in every living organism as well as everyday foods. Various foods have different ratios of these organic molecules for different reasons. For example, corn is a seed and has a high starch content because glucose is the metabolic fuel that the seedling needs to grow. And a chicken drumstick is muscle (protein) used for movement. Knowing the organic groups present in our foods allows us to make choices to maintain a healthy weight and optimistic long-term health outcomes.

It is important not to assume that information you read is correct, but to trust your own scientific investigations to uncover fact vs. fiction. Using the data and results from this laboratory experiment, you will determine the major organic group present in the foods you test. By actively investigating your foods, you will learn incredible facts that will help in your everyday food choices.

To prepare for this Assignment:

  • Review Chapters 3, 4, and 5 of the course text, Nutrition for Life.
  • Think about the foods you eat and the different organic compounds from this week’s resources that may be present in those foods. Many people look at the label for information, but what about food without a nutrition label? Do you always know what is in your food? How can knowing what is in the food you eat change what you eat?

For this Assignment, you will complete an interactive Virtual Lab experience to discover the various component nutrients found in common food items. Click on the link to access and complete the lab activity.

Click on this link to access and complete the lab activity: https://mym.cdn.laureate-media.com/2dett4d/Walden/BIOL/2320/CH/mm/food-lab/index.html

By Day 7

Complete your virtual lab. Once you have completed the lab, be sure to print out your Completion Certificate as a PDF, and submit it to your instructor on or before Day 7. Once your instructor receives your Completion Certificate, he or she will enter a grade of “Complete” in the gradebook.

Questions about this Assignment? Post them in the Contact the Instructor area. That way, everyone in the class will see, and benefit from, the Instructor’s response.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

  • Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK2Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
  • Click the Week 2 Assignment link.
  • Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK2Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
  • If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
  • Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:Submit your Week 2 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7

To submit your Assignment:Week 2 Assignment


Project: Final Project Milestone: Continue Working on Your Final Project

In the Looking Ahead section of Week 1, you were introduced to the Final Project. By now, you should have logged into the MyDietAnalysis program to better understand what type of data you will need to enter into the program. By the end of this week, you should record your 3-day food journal and organize your information. Keeping up with the steps of your Final Project will help you to be better prepared for your final deliverables in Week 5. Be sure to ask your Instructor for guidance, if necessary.

By the end of this week, you should have completed Steps 1 and 2 of the Final Project.

By the end of Week 3, you will submit your MyDietAnalysis Actual vs. Recommended Intakes report and your Activity Summary report.

There is nothing to submit this week. Nevertheless, it is in your best interest to complete each step for the Final Project in advance of the due dates.


Quiz

This 20-question, multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank quiz will assess how well you can apply the information in this week’s assigned readings.

About the quiz:

  • The quiz has a 2-hour time limit.
  • You may take the quiz as many times as you need in order to achieve a passing score.
  • If you encounter technical difficulties during the quiz or if you have questions about how a quiz works in your online classroom, contact the Student Support Team for more information. (The team’s contact information is in the Student Support area.)

By Day 7

Complete this week’s quiz.

Submission and Grading Information

Submit Your Quiz by Day 7

To submit your Quiz:Week 2 Quiz


Week in Review

This week, you examined the role of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in a healthy diet. You also explained the criteria used for determining good and bad carbohydrates/fats. In addition, you investigated component nutrients and analyzed foods to determine major organic groups.

Next week, you will begin to evaluate nutrition and the role of vitamins, minerals and water in keeping a body healthy.

Categories
BIOL 2320C: Nutritional Science

Week 1: Introduction to Nutritional Science

Week 1: Introduction to Nutritional Science

“Lose weight without dieting!”
“Eat the miracle, disease-fighting berry.”
“Try our new, all-natural, trans-fat-free, whole grain cereal.”

The daily influx of nutrition information can be hard to digest. Commercial claims spoon-feed information to consumers about nutrition and food that is not always based on fact and science. Does nutrition information come across as a fast-acting weight loss remedy or a quick fix for a health issue?

This week, you will discover how nutrition is more than just restrictive diets or supplements. It is the scientific study of food and how food nourishes the body and influences health. In this first week, you will consider integrity in science and in academics and apply the scientific method to a mini-investigation from your own life.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
  • Identify factors that influence food choices
  • Explain how your food choices or eating habits may change in the future
  • Demonstrate knowledge of nutritional science
  • Synthesize awareness of one’s dietary choices and how these can result in improved eating habits*

*This Learning Objective is presented in Week 1 and will be completed in Week 5.


Learning Resources

Be sure you do the following as early in the first week as possible:

  • Read the Course Introduction.
  • Read and print out the Syllabus.
  • Save and print the Discussion and Assignment Evaluation Criteria in the Course Information area.
  • Read all of the other information.

Required Readings

Thompson, J., & Manore, M. (2015). Nutrition for life (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Benjamin Cummings.

  • Chapter 1, “Nutrition: Making It Work for You” (pp. 1–37)This introductory chapter provides an overview of basic nutritional concepts including why nutrition is important, scientific elements of nutrients, components of a healthful diet, dietary guidelines, how to read a food label, and trustworthy sources of nutritional information.
  • Chapter 2, “The Human Body: Are We Really What We Eat?” (pp. 38–68)The body is a machine that uses nutrients to create and repair itself. Chapter 2 contains a detailed explanation of the digestive system and how the body breaks down food into usable pieces.

European Food Information Council. (2006). The determinants of food choice. Retrieved from http://www.eufic.org/en/healthy-living/article/the-determinants-of-food-choiceThis review focuses on what influences peoples’ food choices and the barriers to dietary and lifestyle changes. Possible intervention strategies and models for changing food behaviors are discussed.Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. (2018). Food marketing and labeling. Retrieved from http://www.foodsystemprimer.org/food-and-nutrition/food-marketing-and-labeling/index.htmlThis section of the Teaching the Food System curriculum guide focuses on diet and influences on food choices.Pearson. (2016). MyDietAnalysis. Retrieved from https://media.pearsoncmg.com/bc/abp/mydietanalysis/ You will use this resource for your Final Project.

The Walden University Writing Center provides access to writing guidelines, APA style, and summarizes the changes to the 6th edition. Use this resource as a reference to formatting your assignments.Walden University. (2015f). Writing Center: Undergraduate writing: Overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/undergraduateWalden University. (2015e). Writing Center: Scholarly writing: Overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/scholarlyWalden University. (2015a). Writing Center: APA style overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/APAWalden University. (2015b). Writing Center: Citations: Overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/APA/citationsWalden University. (2015d). Writing Center: Reference list: Overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/APA/referencesDocument: How to Access the MyDietAnalysis Tool (Word document)Document: Study Notes: Academic Integrity (Word document)This document will help answer questions you may have about Walden University’s policies on academic integrity.

Optional Resources

APA Style. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.apastyle.org/Benos, D. J., Fabres, J., Farmer, J., Gutierrez, J. P., Hennessy, K., Kosek, D., … Wang, K. (2005). Ethics and scientific publication. Advances in Physiology Education, 29(2), 59–74. Retrieved from http://advan.physiology.org/content/29/2/59.full.pdf+htmlCicutto, L. (2008). Plagiarism: Avoiding the peril in scientific writing. CHEST, 133(2), 579–581. Retrieved from http://journal.publications.chestnet.org/article.aspx?articleid=1085699Harvard School of Public Health. (n.d.-d). What should I eat? The Nutrition Source. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/Researchers at Harvard outline tips for healthy eating through their Healthy Eating Plate initiative. This site includes information on healthy body weight, choosing drinks, staying active, recipes, and answers to nutrition questions.Purdue Online Writing Lab. (2016). Retrieved from http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/United States Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.choosemyplate.gov/The United States Department of Agriculture provides information on healthy eating based on the MyPlate model presented on this site. Consumers can design personalized menu plans, look up the nutrition values of foods, see guidelines for different age groups, and follow the USDA on Twitter.Walden University. (2015h). Writing Center: Walden templates: Overview. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/templates


Discussion: Making Sense of Nutrition

Have you ever noticed how the food choices you make on a day-to-day basis affect so much more than just your weight? Food impacts your mental health, physical health, mood, stamina, and energy level, to name just a few. For example, choosing a meal high in carbohydrates and low in protein has a very different impact on all of those things than a meal balanced with good lipids, good carbohydrate sources, and lean protein. Understanding why you may choose one food over another goes a long way toward making better choices. Shifting habit and food preference away from those foods that do not serve your body and mind well toward those foods that do is an important step toward maintaining your health for a long time to come.

To prepare for this Discussion:

  • Review this week’s Learning Resources.
  • Think about the role food plays in your life.
  • Reflect on factors that may influence your food choices (e.g., cultural, economic, biological, etc.).
  • Think back to a moment of “new learning” you experienced this week. What were you reading or thinking about in that moment? Will your food choices or eating habits change as a result of this information?

By Day 3

Post a brief description of the role that food plays in your life. Describe at least two factors that might influence your food choices and explain why. Finally, describe a moment of “new learning” you experienced this week. Be specific in your description of the topic or content you learned that was new information to you and provide an explanation of how you may integrate this “new learning” into your life. Explain how your food choices or eating habits may change as a result of this information.

Be sure to support your ideas by connecting them to the week’s Learning Resources, or something you have read, heard, seen, or experienced. Use at least two scientific APA-formatted references for full credit.

Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

By Day 5

Respond to at least two of your colleagues’ postings in one or more of the following ways:

  • At least one response must be on the topic in which you did not initially post.
  • Ask a probing question.
  • Share an insight from having read your colleague’s posting.
  • Offer and support an opinion.
  • Validate an idea with your own experience.
  • Make a suggestion.
  • Expand on your colleague’s posting.

Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of the comments your colleagues made.

Submission and Grading Information

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:Week 1 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 and Respond by Day 5

To participate in this Discussion:Week 1 Discussion


Quiz

This 20-question, multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank quiz will assess how well you can apply the information in this week’s assigned readings.

About the quiz:

  • The quiz has a 2-hour time limit.
  • You may take the quiz as many times as you need in order to achieve a passing score.
  • If you encounter technical difficulties during the quiz or if you have questions about how a quiz works in your online classroom, contact the Student Support Team for more information. (The team’s contact information is in the Student Support area.)

By Day 7

Complete this week’s quiz.

Submission and Grading Information

Submit Your Quiz by Day 7

To submit your Quiz:Week 1 Quiz


Week in Review

This week, you identified factors that influence your food choices and explained how those choices or eating habits may change in the future.

Next week, you will examine the building blocks of nutrition, including how food is labeled and how to identify its nutrient content.


Looking Ahead

Final Project Overview: Analyze Your Diet With MyDietAnalysis

For your Final Project, due in Week 5, you will use the MyDietAnalysis program. The program will analyze your nutritional intake and exercise patterns. From this analysis, you will make recommendations for changes in your eating habits and determine how you can implement them into your life. This project will give you the opportunity to apply your coursework to your own life and participate in the science of nutrition.

Your Final Project has been broken up into several milestones to better help you manage your time. The Final Project Milestones correspond to the steps listed below. Meeting these milestones will help you complete the project gradually over the next 4 weeks. While you will not receive a grade for your work until Week 3, it is highly recommended that you complete each Final Project Milestone as designated in the timeline below, so that you have ample time in Week 5 to complete and review your paper before submission.

Final Project Steps

Step 1: Record everything you eat and drink for 3 days in a row.

  • Record all the foods and beverages you consume over the course of 3 days. The best 3 days to choose are 2 weekdays and a weekend day, although it is your decision as to which days contain the most “normal” food consumption for you. Do not alter your normal eating pattern.
  • In a lab notebook or food diary, record the amount of food and beverages consumed, including water. Do not record any mineral or vitamin supplements. Do record protein supplements.
  • Be sure to describe each food completely. This includes brand names, ingredients in a recipe, etc. For homemade items, be sure to record portions of all the components in your food, because you will input them separately if no comparable meal can be found in MyDietAnalysis.
  • Record any exercise you perform.
  • Make note of how you feel physically and emotionally after you eat a specific food or meal. Great insight can be gained by closely observing how your body reacts to foods.

Step 2: Organize your recorded information.

  • Type each day’s food and beverages into the menu form: breakfast, snack, lunch, etc. Include everything from your food diary or lab notebook and record them separated by day.
  • Label each item on your menu with the code or codes that indicate why you chose to eat that food or drink that beverage.
CodeMotivation
APersonal preference (I like it.)
BHabit or tradition (It’s familiar; I always eat it.)
CSocial pressure (It was offered; I couldn’t refuse.)
DAvailability (I was hungry and it was nearby.)
EConvenience (I was too rushed to prepare anything else.)
FEconomy (It was a food I could afford.)
GHealth value (I think it is healthy for me to eat.)
HAdvertising
IOther (explain)

Step 3: Enter your organized diet information into the MyDietAnalysis program.

  • Enter the foods you ate into the MyDietAnalysis program.
  • Be sure to create a new profile to reflect your recorded information. The program will ask you questions about yourself—be honest! It is important to capture your true self for MyDietAnalysis to be accurate and representative of your needs.
  • After you have created your profile, click on the DIET TRACKER tab at the top of the program.
  • Enter your foods as accurately as possible. Do this for each new day and save changes when finished.
  • Next, click on the ACTIVITY TRACKER and record any additional exercise you may have completed above and beyond your profile’s activity level. (For example, if you are sedentary and you walk the dog, realize that this activity is included in the sedentary profile. However, if you run for 10 minutes this should be added as additional exercise.)
  • Finally, click on the REPORTS tab.
  • Download the Actual Intakes vs. Recommended Intakes and the Activity Summary reports as PDF documents. This information will be included in your final report.

Steps 1–3 will be due by Day 7 of Week 3.

Step 4: Analyze your diet in a formal report.

Include the following information:

  1. List any vitamins and minerals that averaged less than 100% of the RDA.
  2. For each vitamin or mineral that averaged less than 100% of the RDA, suggest two foods that would increase the amount of that nutrient in your diet.
    • Why did you pick those foods? Are they realistic to YOUR diet?
    • Suggest ways you would incorporate them directly into your diet.
  3. How many grams of fiber did you consume per day?
    • What is the recommended intake per day?
    • If you ate less than the recommended daily intake, how could you realistically increase your fiber?
    • If you ate more than the recommendation, what are the foods in your diet that are contributing to this total?
    • Please be sure to describe the differences between soluble fiber and insoluble fiber.
  4. How many different fruits, vegetables, and grains did you consume daily?
    • Could your diet benefit from more diversity? Why?
    • What are some of the reasons fruits and vegetables are hard to include in your diet? Is it because of past memories of eating them? Taste? If you love fruits and vegetables, can you offer an idea why others may not?
    • What is it about fruits and vegetables that make them so nutritious? Discuss three major components of these foods and why they are beneficial.
  5. What have you learned about your eating habits? Pay attention to the codes you assigned to your foods.
  6. Provide your overall observations of your diet. Summarize your codes and reflect on what is your major driving force when it comes to food.
  7. Describe any changes that you have made or plan to make as a result of this exercise. Provide a detailed answer to receive full credit. Answers such as “I plan to eat more fruits and vegetables” without a clear plan will not be awarded full points.

Your Final Project is due by Day 7 of Week 5.

Directions for formatting your Final Project report:

  • Keep all data in one file (unless different formats do not allow them to be together in one file).
  • Cite at least three APA-formatted scientific references. You do not need to reference your values from MyDietAnalysis. (In other words, if you consumed 5000mg of sodium, you don’t need to reference that.)
  • Be sure to complete the assignment in complete essay form. (Do not write the question and then the answer—use full paragraphs.) The 4- to 6-page requirement does not include your charts and motivation codes.
  • Use double spacing, 12-point Times New Roman, and APA format. Page count is 4–6 pages. A template for this paper can be found at the Walden University Writing Center located in the Optional Resources for this week. Click on “General Templates” and then “APA Course Paper Template With Advice (6th ed.)” under “Course Paper.” This template will help you format your Final Project paper correctly.

Timeline:

Week 2: Complete Steps 1 and 2.
Week 3: Complete Step 3 and submit Actual Intakes vs. Recommended Intakes and the Activity Summary reports from MyDietAnalysis by Day 7 of Week 3.
Week 4: Complete Step 4.
Week 5: Submit Final Project by Day 7 of Week 5.

Questions about this Assignment? Post them in the Contact the Instructor area. That way, everyone in the class will see, and benefit from, the Instructor’s response.

Your Final Project is due by Week 5, Day 7. Starting in Week 2, each week has a Final Project Milestone that corresponds to one of the sections of your Final Project, which will help you complete the project gradually over the next 4 weeks. It is highly recommended that you complete each Final Project Milestone in the designated week so that you have ample time in Week 5 to complete and review your paper before submission.

There is nothing to submit this week. To stay on track, however, you should begin planning when you are going to record 3 days of typical eating. You should also review the MyDietAnalysis program to understand how it works.

Next Week